Pumpkin Pasta with Toasted Walnuts and Spinach

Posted on October 15 by
in Blog

Ingredients

8 ounces of your choice of pasta***
1 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 cloves fresh garlic, minced
1 cup pure pumpkin puree (I used canned)
2 tbsp tomato paste
2 tbsp half and half (Exclude for a vegan recipe.)
1 cup vegetable broth
pinch ground nutmeg
Cracked black pepper and salt to taste
2 cups baby spinach, heaping
1/4 cup chopped toasted walnuts
Parmesan cheese (Optional; Use crushed walnuts for a vegan recipe.)

Instructions

Cook the pasta and set aside but keep it warm.

While the pasta cooks, bring a large skillet to medium heat and add the olive oil and minced garlic. Cook just until fragrant. Whisk in the tomato paste, pumpkin, and half and half. Add the vegetable broth. Stir and let cook on low about 5 minutes.

Add the spinach. Cook until it lightly wilts.

Stir in pasta and toss to coat. Sprinkle with walnuts and Parmesan, if desired and serve.

***You can use spaghetti squash, zucchini noodles, Miracle noodles, shiratake noodles or any low carb noodles for a reduced calorie/sugar version.

Pumpkin-Pasta-Pin-1

A cookie alternative....

Posted on October 11 by
in Blog

Ironically enough, I was looking for a healthy baked treat for my dog and came across this product. I am very impressed by the all natural ingredients and the macro-nutrient balance. For two cookies, there is only 4 grams of net carbs and 7 grams of healthy fats and protein!
They are delicious, so portion control may be an issue...

1 c

FIBER

Posted on October 11 by
in Blog

We need between 25 and 50 grams of fiber per day for various reasons, such as, heart health, cancer prevention, improved bone density, weight loss and reduced brain inflammation.

The reason to ditch grains as your main source of fiber is that a high-grain diet promotes insulin and leptin resistance, thereby raising your risk for chronic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. A much better choice is to focus on eating more vegetables, nuts and seeds, including:

Organic whole, unsweetened husk psyllium. Taking psyllium three times daily could add as much as 18 grams of fiber to your diet.

Chia seeds. A single tablespoon will provide about 5 grams of fiber.

Sprouts such as sunflower sprouts

Berries

Vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts

Root vegetables and tubers, including onions, sweet potatoes and jicama

Mushrooms such as button, chanterelle, maitake, shiitake and oyster mushroom

Peas and beans. Keep in mind beans are best avoided if you are sensitive to lectins.

Friday Funny....

Posted on October 05 by
in Blog

Request Appointment

Fill out form below or call 480-540-7865